When we talk about god lets be honest

Added: Norris Stonecipher - Date: 17.07.2021 05:34 - Views: 30458 - Clicks: 9921

Most people in the world have no experience of lasting joy in their lives. All of our resources exist to guide you toward everlasting joy in Jesus Christ. You are not the first Christian to have felt angry at God. And you will not be the last to feel the urge to blame him. We Christians can be prone, in our pain, to point a finger and raise a fist at heaven. If we believe in God at all, we should believe he is bigger and stronger than we can even fathom.

Even when others mean evil against us, God means it for good Genesis He is stronger than any threat against his children, and whatever he lovingly allows into our lives, he does so for our full and final good, even as it is indeed painful, not pleasant Hebrews We talk about God bringing trials into our lives, and God testing usand we should.

And yet we need to be careful, as our vision of his sovereignty expands, that we not attribute something to him in a way the Scriptures do not. James himself, sensing a possible misunderstanding of his powerful rally to count our trials as joy, wants to make sure we When we talk about god lets be honest God is not the dispenser of evil in the same way he is the giver of good.

He stands sovereignly over both good and evil, but he stands directly behind good, and indirectly, as it were, over evil. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire. James — In Greek, the noun trials in verse 2 and the verb tempt in verses 13—14 have the same root and make the connection clearer to the original readers, even as these words take on distinct meanings in their contexts and so we translate them differently in English. Verse 2 emphasizes external testing, while verses 13—14 focus on internal temptation. What James hopes to maintain for us in both our external trials and the resulting internal temptations is that God is never the one to blame.

God is indeed sovereign over evil, but in such a way that he is never the author of evil. He is never the one to blame for our pain, but rather the sovereign one to whom we turn for help. James —17 has this very clarification in view:. Do not be deceived, my beloved brothers. Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow due to change.

God is indeed fully and utterly in control of his world, from the biggest details to the very smallest. He does bring suffering and pain into our lives — but never in such a way that he is the one to blame for our pain. He is the one who gives generously when we ask. He is the one to whom we reach out for help. James —8, then, becomes clearer in light of his coming charge not to blame God in pain, but come to him for help. But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea that is driven and tossed by the wind.

For that person must not suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways. Doubt here as is often misunderstood is not a humble crisis of faith, but arrogant anger at God. The basic sin James calls attention to in his letter is this double-mindedness James ;which is a kind of halfhearted compromise with the world. This is what suffering does: it tests our love for this world. Are we double-minded, trying to put our trust in both God and his world, or is he our greatest treasure? The heart of such double-mindedness is blaming God for our pain When we talk about god lets be honest, at the same time, asking for his help and relief.

The truth that God is sovereign over all things Romans does not mean that he is sovereign over good and evil in the same way. He stands directly behind every good gift James but not directly behind evil James He is the giver of every good and perfect gift, but never the author of evil. One passage in the Bible where such asymmetry in God is captured so beautifully and powerfully, as a shining light in the midst of very great darkness, is Lamentations — Though he cause grief, he will have compassion according to the abundance of his steadfast love; for he does not afflict from his heart or grieve the children of men.

Though God does cause grief, he does not grieve from the heart. Though he does afflict, he does not do so from the heart. Is this just doublespeak? Or does it point powerfully to something deep in the heart of God that can help us know we can trust him, come what may? A similar sighting of such asymmetry comes in Romans — As the apostle Paul makes as plain in this chapter, God is sovereign over all things, including the eternal destiny of morally able humans — and yet that does not mean that God wills good and evil to equal ends.

What if God, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience vessels of wrath prepared for destruction, in order to make known the riches of his glory for vessels of mercy, which he has prepared beforehand for glory? They always serve a greater purpose — in the universe and in his own heart: to make known the riches of his glory to those on whom he has mercy.

As John Piper comments on these verses. Though God does accomplish all things by the counsel of his will, he does not bring about all things in the same way. In the accomplishment of some things he employs intermediary agents perhaps. Or to put it another way, his heart is engaged differently in different acts, loving some When we talk about god lets be honest in themselves and inclining to others only as they are preferable in relation to greater ends cf.

Lamentations If this is the case, Paul would be implying that not wrath but mercy is the greater, overarching goal for which God does all things. Justification of God— The world, the flesh, and the devil may conspire in our suffering to tempt us to be angry at God for bringing or permitting pain and loss into our lives. Such anger at God is always sin in us in some form or fashion. It is never right to be angry with God. We never have just cause for blaming him.

He is always in the right. In him is light, and no darkness at all 1 John Anger at sin is good Markbut anger at goodness is sin. That is why it is never right to be angry with God. He is always and only good, no matter how strange and painful his ways with us. Anger toward God ifies that he is bad or weak or cruel or foolish. None of those is true, and all of them dishonor him.

Therefore, it is never right to be angry at God. That would be like getting angry at the surgeon who cuts us. It might be right if the surgeon slips and makes a mistake. But God never slips. But if we do find, as many Christians have, that we have anger in our hearts toward God, let it be said loud and clear that we should not add the sin of hypocrisy to the sin of being angry at God.

We should never cultivate or seek to stir up anger with God in ourselves or in anyone else. Anger can be righteous, but anger with God is never righteous. Our anger with God always betrays some fault in us, never in him. Such simple and complex truths play out week in and week out in our local churches and Christian communities.

It is always sin to be angry with him, and he is never to blame in our pain. Christians do get angry with God. About Give. June 1, Close. David Mathis is executive editor for desiringGod. Poisonous Tolerance David Mathis Jun 20, David Mathis Modal. James —14 In Greek, the noun trials in verse 2 and the verb tempt in verses 13—14 have the same root and make the connection clearer to the original readers, even as these words take on distinct meanings in their contexts and so When we talk about god lets be honest translate them differently in English.

James —17 has this very clarification in view: Do not be deceived, my beloved brothers. As John Piper comments on these verses, Though God does accomplish all things by the counsel of his will, he does not bring about all things in the same way. Piper, It Is Never Right to Be Angry with God But if we do find, as many Christians have, that we have anger in our hearts toward God, let it be said loud and clear that we should not add the sin of hypocrisy to the sin of being angry at God.

The rights of the weak rest in the hands of the strong. John Piper. To the Praise of the Glory of Grace John Piper as he walks through the first three chapters of Ephesians, showing how the main points relate, all in under twelve minutes.

When we talk about god lets be honest

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